One Day. One G-d. One Venture.

Parashat Shabbat Shemot Readings and Video Commentary

Exodus 1:1 – 6:1; Isaiah 27:6 – 28:13; 29:22-23; Jeremiah 1:1 – 2:3

Commentary by Rabbi Chaim Richman, The Temple Institute, Jerusalem, Israel

„The book of Exodus is called in Hebrew the book of Names, (Shemot). Why? What’s in a name and why does Torah repeat the names of the seventy souls of Israel who descended into Egypt when their names were already mentioned earlier in the book of Genesis? Torah has come to teach us a deep and essential lesson in self-knowledge.:“

Shabbat Shalom

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Shabbat Bo Readings and Commentary

Exodus 10:1–13:16; Jeremiah 46:13-26

Abstract of the Commentary by Michael Schneider, Jerusalem:
This week’s Torah portion BO („Come“) speaks about the last three plagues over Egypt, where God showed the mighty Pharaoh His great power. The final plague follows with the triumphant Exodus of the people of Israel from Egypt, from slavery into freedom.

Jewish scholars explain that the first nine plagues are divided into three-year cycles. Before every three-year cycle, the LORD commanded Moses early in the morning to stand before Pharaoh in the presence of many (7:15; 8:16; 9:13) and forewarned him of what was coming (7:17; 8:17). The third time of every cycle Moses stood before Pharaoh, it came without warning (8:12).

In the beginning, Pharaoh’s heart was hardened, he refused let the people go, but then stepwise he did allow the people sacrifice to the God of Israel. Then he said it was okay for the men, women and children to leave Egypt, but without the livestock and finally God had the victory, calling the children out with wealth and blessings.

    Video-Commentary by Rabbi Chaim Richman, Temple Institute, Jerusalem:

    A new world order. Sounds scary, but thats exactly what G-d established
    when he commanded Israel, saying, „This month shall be to you the head of
    the months; to you it shall be the first of the months of the year. (Ex. 12:2)

Even Pharaoh’s advisors told him to let God’s people go, but Pharaoh’s pride and selfish ambitions kept him from listening to counsel. May we also be careful and recognize our pride early on, willing to humble ourselves and surrender all. The punishment for Pharaoh and ‘all who trusted him’ came later through Nebuchadnezzar when he ruled Babylon (Jeremiah 46).

Remember it took only three days to leave Egypt, but 40 years for Egypt and her cults and idols to leave the minds and hearts of Israel.
In order to know the exact timing of the Exodus we must begin with the Babylonian exile, which we know happened in 586 BOT. If we add another 390 ‘day-years’ mentioned in Ezekiel 4:4-13 we come to the year King Solomon divided the two kingdoms into Israel and Judea in 976 BOT. Take another 36 (40 less 4) years of Solomon’s reign and the 480 years between his throne and the time of the Exodus described in 1 Kings 6:1 and the date comes to 1492 BOT!

Commandments were given, still used today, which commemorates the Exodus from Egypt. A blameless lamb should be kept on the 10th of Nissan and on the 14th slaughtered and eaten at the last supper on the 15th of Nissan at the last night.

According to the faith of Christianity the Exodus also foreshadows the sacrificial atonement of the Lamb of God who, although blameless, was slaughtered on the cross. For the Children of God, celebrating the evening before brought salvation, but to those who opposed Him, it brought death. A lesson to us!

Concerning the final plague, the Lord had the final say. While Pharaoh was guilty of murdering all the Hebrew newborns, God went and killed Pharaoh’s first-born child.

Shabbat Shalom

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Parashat Shemot Readings and Commentary

Exodus 1:1 – 6:1; Isaiah 27:6 – 28:13; 29:22-23; Jeremiah 1:1 – 2:3

Abstract of the Commentary by Michael Schneider, Jerusalem:
This week’s Shabbat reading begins in the book Exodus with God leading the children of Israel out of Egypt hundreds of years after Josephs’ death. Egyptologist David Rohl believes the Exodus happened in 1207 BC, including 40 years of wanderings in the desert.

    For the God’s Sabbath International Readership:
    Here is a film about Exodus of 52 min. duration

From 70 of the house of Jacob a nation of 600,000 men was born. At this time, his descendents “did not know Joseph,” know meaning in Hebrew the same as “loved.”

The people of Israel encountered greater hardships. It is the first time in scripture where affliction’s end came with deliverance and salvation!

When the murder of children on the Nile began (v. 22), God heard the cries of his people and remembered his covenant with Abraham, Isaac and Jacob. The Lord did not answer before accomplishing great things.

Chapter two begins with the birth of Moses whose life was spared as his mother placed him in a basket down the Nile, leading to Pharaoh’s daughter and he became known as the “Prince of Egypt.”

Chapter three tells of Moses’ first encounter with God at the “burning bush,” where the LORD promised him a “Land flowing with milk and money,” and so the exodus begins. It was also here the LORD called Moses to deliver the people out of Egypt.

The following chapter speaks of human weakness as Moses asks, “what should I say or do…so they can believe me.” Don’t we sometimes struggle with having faith?

Moses confronted the heard-hearted Pharaoh with only and staff and great faith because he was sure God would give him the words to speak.

Yet, we find verse 16 most interesting as it says, “…he will be as a mouth for you and you will be (as) God to him!” What does this mean? Moses actedd as a mediator between man and God, a representative of God.

God forewarned Moses of the difficulty he’d encounter when approaching Pharaoh, but assured him that it would be the power of the Almighty God of Israel that would rescue the children of Israel.

Our portion ends with the words from Isaiah 29:23. “But when he sees his children, the work of My hands, in his midst, They will sanctify My name; Indeed, they will sanctify the Holy One of Jacob and will stand in awe of the God of Israel.” Here is our comfort!

Shabbat Shalom

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Parashat Shabbat BO Readings and Commentary

Exodus 10:1–13:16; Jeremiah 46:13-26

Abstract of the Commentary by Michael Schneider, Jerusalem:
This week’s Torah portion BO („Come“) speaks about the last three plagues over Egypt, where God showed the mighty Pharaoh His great power. The final plague follows with the triumphant Exodus of the people of Israel from Egypt, from slavery into freedom.

Jewish scholars explain that the first nine plagues are divided into three-year cycles. Before every three-year cycle, the LORD commanded Moses early in the morning to stand before Pharaoh in the presence of many (7:15; 8:16; 9:13) and forewarned him of what was coming (7:17; 8:17). The third time of every cycle Moses stood before Pharaoh, it came without warning (8:12).

In the beginning, Pharaoh’s heart was hardened, he refused let the people go, but then stepwise he did allow the people sacrifice to the God of Israel. Then he said it was okay for the men, women and children to leave Egypt, but without the livestock and finally God had the victory, calling the children out with wealth and blessings.

    Video-Commentary by Rabbi Chaim Richman, Temple Institute, Jerusalem:

    A new world order. Sounds scary, but thats exactly what G-d established
    when he commanded Israel, saying, „This month shall be to you the head of
    the months; to you it shall be the first of the months of the year. (Ex. 12:2)

Even Pharaoh’s advisors told him to let God’s people go, but Pharaoh’s pride and selfish ambitions kept him from listening to counsel. May we also be careful and recognize our pride early on, willing to humble ourselves and surrender all. The punishment for Pharaoh and ‘all who trusted him’ came later through Nebuchadnezzar when he ruled Babylon (Jeremiah 46).

Remember it took only three days to leave Egypt, but 40 years for Egypt and her cults and idols to leave the minds and hearts of Israel.
In order to know the exact timing of the Exodus we must begin with the Babylonian exile, which we know happened in 586 BOT. If we add another 390 ‘day-years’ mentioned in Ezekiel 4:4-13 we come to the year King Solomon divided the two kingdoms into Israel and Judea in 976 BOT. Take another 36 (40 less 4) years of Solomon’s reign and the 480 years between his throne and the time of the Exodus described in 1 Kings 6:1 and the date comes to 1492 BOT!

Commandments were given, still used today, which commemorates the Exodus from Egypt. A blameless lamb should be kept on the 10th of Nissan and on the 14th slaughtered and eaten at the last supper on the 15th of Nissan at the last night.

According to the faith of Christianity the Exodus also foreshadows the sacrificial atonement of the Lamb of God who, although blameless, was slaughtered on the cross. For the Children of God, celebrating the evening before brought salvation, but to those who opposed Him, it brought death. A lesson to us!

Concerning the final plague, the Lord had the final say. While Pharaoh was guilty of murdering all the Hebrew newborns, God went and killed Pharaoh’s first-born child.

Shabbat Shalom

Comments are off for this post

Parashat Shabbat Shemot Readings and Commentary

Exodus 1:1 – 6:1; Isaiah 27:6 – 28:13; 29:22-23; Jeremiah 1:1 – 2:3

Abstract of the Commentary by Michael Schneider, Jerusalem:
This week’s Shabbat reading begins in the book Exodus with God leading the children of Israel out of Egypt hundreds of years after Josephs’ death. Egyptologist David Rohl believes the Exodus happened in 1207 BC, including 40 years of wanderings in the desert.

    For the God’s Sabbath International Readership:
    Here is a film about Exodus of 52 min. duration

From 70 of the house of Jacob a nation of 600,000 men was born. At this time, his descendents “did not know Joseph,” know meaning in Hebrew the same as “loved.”

The people of Israel encountered greater hardships. It is the first time in scripture where affliction’s end came with deliverance and salvation!

When the murder of children on the Nile began (v. 22), God heard the cries of his people and remembered his covenant with Abraham, Isaac and Jacob. The Lord did not answer before accomplishing great things.

Chapter two begins with the birth of Moses whose life was spared as his mother placed him in a basket down the Nile, leading to Pharaoh’s daughter and he became known as the “Prince of Egypt.”

Chapter three tells of Moses’ first encounter with God at the “burning bush,” where the LORD promised him a “Land flowing with milk and money,” and so the exodus begins. It was also here the LORD called Moses to deliver the people out of Egypt.

The following chapter speaks of human weakness as Moses asks, “what should I say or do…so they can believe me.” Don’t we sometimes struggle with having faith?

Moses confronted the heard-hearted Pharaoh with only and staff and great faith because he was sure God would give him the words to speak.

Yet, we find verse 16 most interesting as it says, “…he will be as a mouth for you and you will be (as) God to him!” What does this mean? Moses actedd as a mediator between man and God, a representative of God.

God forewarned Moses of the difficulty he’d encounter when approaching Pharaoh, but assured him that it would be the power of the Almighty God of Israel that would rescue the children of Israel.

Our portion ends with the words from Isaiah 29:23. “But when he sees his children, the work of My hands, in his midst, They will sanctify My name; Indeed, they will sanctify the Holy One of Jacob and will stand in awe of the God of Israel.” Here is our comfort!

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Sukkot Feast of Tabernacles Readings and Commentary

1st day: Hallel; Lev 22:26-23:44; Numbers 29:12-16; Haftara: Zech 14
2nd day: Hallel; Lev 22:26-23:44; Numbers 29:12-16; Haftara: 1.Kings 8:2-21

The Feast of Tabernacles is a fest of joy, Hag Sukkot Sameach, and we want to invite you to shake the lulav and to feel it beating the heart, okay? Please feel invited to have a look into a Sukkah in a childreans song: read more…

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Archetype Exodus

For Greeting Card click here >>
The Archetype ExodusThoughts by Eric Martienssen
English translation by Pastor Rolf Piller O.B.M..
The translator does not necessarily agree with everything he translates.

The term „Archetype Exodus“ (Greek for „archetype“ and „departure / exodus“) resulted through the phenomena that in 2009 happened of the sequence in time by the biblical Passah Feast and the heathen Easter-Feast, also Seder and Last Supper. The later will be in 2009 like through a miracle – when did that happen last – celebrated directly following its biblical original! (Seder March 8th / Maundy Thursday March 9th, 2009).

What is it about:
(In brief: All goyim are lacking the archetypical experience capability of the Exodus / personal deliverance from bondage – therefore God meets them with one of His Sons [Son of God], so that they may experience personal deliverance and now also be united with the Father.)

  • The Seder meal – it forms the prelude to the biblical feast for the memory of Israel‘s exodus from Egypt, also God‘s salvation / redemption of His people from bondage, Passah Feast or simply called Pesach (Hebrew).
  • The Exodus – it is an undeletable memory, longing and promise experienced only in an Jewish soul. Beyond the Seder there exists a weekly memorial day, the Shabbat (the eternal sign between Jews and God, Exodus 31:12-14), who offered His beloved and chosen people from God among others also for the purpose to remember consciously His salvation from the Egyptian bondage (Deut 15:5). Passah like Shabbat are also a guaranty for the soulish staying awake in an exclusive love relationship in an eternal covenant of salvation, experience and promise of God with regard to His exclusive and holy people. The Archetype Exodus is an – because experienced by no other people on their own body – only to be experienced and remembered event by Jews!
  • The Last Supper – it is also called Holy Supper, is a remembrance instituted by Jesus (Mt. 26:26-28) for the New Covenant in context with the Seder Feast. Unfortunately, through moving the Passah Feast to the unbiblical Easter Feast, the original meaning of the Seder has been lost. Unbiblical because, Jesus Christ, obedient to the instruction (hebr. Tora), kept on that evening only God‘s order (hebr. Seder) together with His disciples, and not a future replacement feast for Pesach initiated.

As the Church, respectively her precursor, included the letters in the Bible canon, looked the laws and biblical feasts since increasingly so, as if they would be legalistic forms of the Jews. And while Jesus postulated in the Gospels: „Salvation comes from the Jews“, the nations (Gentiles, heathen or in the Bible often also summarized as „Egyptians“) in the course of Church history through mis – interpretations of those Epistles more and more as justified and the Jews became the mission target. Only in 1965 accepted the declaration „Nostre Aetate“ of the 2. Vatikan Council again Judaism as an independent religion, in which the Christian faith is rooted. But than in 2007, the Pope permitted again the precouncil Good Friday intercession, in which after the „Last Communion“ on Maundy Thursday it was anew allowed to pray for the „blindfolded, impenitent and perfidious (faithless, unbelieving) Jews“.

Even to the early Apostles was a assigned an superior teaching authority. In Judaism however their is no higher teaching authority, because the ONLY teaching authority is God Himself. Whilst Jesus in the Gospels refers exclusively and constantly to God as the ONLY ONE, i.e. „You shall worship the Lord, your God, and serve him alone“, so from the 2nd century onward increasingly he himself was handed down as the ONE Saviour. The next irritation came through the uprising of „Replacement theology“. Did these developments reflect the spirit of Jesus? Here may everyone draw his own, liberating conclusions, that lead to a biblically mature, responsible dialogue in the Christian-Jewish cooperation. Apropos – as far as the Exodus and resulting deliverance are concerned – the word „deliverance“ has – as a Rabbi explained us recently – in the Hebrew the same letter as the word „responsibility“. The latter merely with the letter Aleph up front, that stands for ONE.

Already from the beginning of the 4th Century was Judaism finally replaced, at least till today, as root by Christianity. The new root was named Constantine (acc. „Paulinus“ Weekly News in Bistum Trier, special edition of June 2nd, 2007: „Recollection of the roots – With Constantine was the Christian Occident founded / Trier remembers the great Emporer“). First result of the „Constantine turning point“ were new laws, which forbad keeping all customs and ways of the „Hebrews“ – first of all it was tried to eliminate the soulish participation of memories about the Exodus from Egypt (also among Christians).

„One of the laws denied the Jews even the spreading of their religion, at that time Judaism stopped to be a proselyting religion. Not only that Judaism was not allowed to recruit proselyts, a law from 315 forbad even conversion to Judaism by threat and execution of death by fire.“ (citation Marita Sara Meyer, paragraph I. The Establishment of Christianity lead to first Schism).

But, and that is the miracle, the Jews kept their redemption from bondage, in heart and in Spirit. It was founded by God and it remained inseparable connected with God till today. Enviable, or? And the Gojim, where did they remain? God met them in one of His son, so that they may experience also personally salvation and be now united with the Father as well. But, as we were just reading, it was than – like once with the Jews – quickly again an end, less through Constantine, then through their own decision, like i.e. the Feast of Shabbat moved to Sunday and thus desecrated, or even the mind alienation of further from God biblically determined feasts. Is it therefore not a wonder, which we should welcome with all our heart, that we now, standing still at the beginning of a new millennium, can celebrate together with all Jews, and first of all the Jew Jesus, in mind and in the spirit of Seder? Is it not pure reconciliation grace, that this year the „three days and three nights in the heart of the earth“ are really existing, as pronounced by Jesus, as with Jona?

Shabbat Shalom and Hag Pesach Sameach!

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Shabbat BO Readings and Commentary

Exodus 10:1–13:16; Jeremiah 46:13-26

Abstract of the Commentary by Michael Schneider
israel today, Jerusalem:

This week’s Torah portion BO („Come“) speaks about the last three plagues over Egypt, where God showed the mighty Pharaoh His great power. The final plague follows with the triumphant Exodus of the people of Israel from Egypt, from slavery into freedom.

Jewish scholars explain that the first nine plagues are divided into three-year cycles. Before every three-year cycle, the LORD commanded Moses early in the morning to stand before Pharaoh in the presence of many (7:15; 8:16; 9:13) and forewarned him of what was coming (7:17; 8:17). The third time of every cycle Moses stood before Pharaoh, it came without warning (8:12).

In the beginning, Pharaoh’s heart was hardened, he refused let the people go, but then stepwise he did allow the people sacrifice to the God of Israel. Then he said it was okay for the men, women and children to leave Egypt, but without the livestock and finally God had the victory, calling the children out with wealth and blessings.

    X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X
    Video-Commentary by Rabbi Chaim Richman, Temple Institute, Jerusalem:

    A new world order. Sounds scary, but thats exactly what G-d established
    when he commanded Israel, saying, „This month shall be to you the head of
    the months; to you it shall be the first of the months of the year. (Ex. 12:2)

    X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X

Even Pharaoh’s advisors told him to let God’s people go, but Pharaoh’s pride and selfish ambitions kept him from listening to counsel. May we also be careful and recognize our pride early on, willing to humble ourselves and surrender all. The punishment for Pharaoh and ‘all who trusted him’ came later through Nebuchadnezzar when he ruled Babylon (Jeremiah 46).

Remember it took only three days to leave Egypt, but 40 years for Egypt and her cults and idols to leave the minds and hearts of Israel.
In order to know the exact timing of the Exodus we must begin with the Babylonian exile, which we know happened in 586 BOT. If we add another 390 ‘day-years’ mentioned in Ezekiel 4:4-13 we come to the year King Solomon divided the two kingdoms into Israel and Judea in 976 BOT. Take another 36 (40 less 4) years of Solomon’s reign and the 480 years between his throne and the time of the Exodus described in 1 Kings 6:1 and the date comes to 1492 BOT!

Commandments were given, still used today, which commemorates the Exodus from Egypt. A blameless lamb should be kept on the 10th of Nissan and on the 14th slaughtered and eaten at the last supper on the 15th of Nissan at the last night.

According to the faith of Christianity the Exodus also foreshadows the sacrificial atonement of the Lamb of God who, although blameless, was slaughtered on the cross. For the Children of God, celebrating the evening before brought salvation, but to those who opposed Him, it brought death. A lesson to us!

Concerning the final plague, the Lord had the final say. While Pharaoh was guilty of murdering all the Hebrew newborns, God went and killed Pharaoh’s first-born child.

Shabbat Shalom

Comments are off for this post

Archetype Exodus, Passover and Seder – Greeting Cards

For Greeting Card click here >>
The Archetype ExodusThoughts by Eric Martienssen
English translation by Pastor Rolf Piller O.B.M..
The translator does not necessarily agree with everything he translates.

The term „Archetype Exodus“ (Greek for „archetype“ and „departure / exodus“) resulted through the phenomena that in 2009 happened of the sequence in time by the biblical Passah Feast and the heathen Easter-Feast, also Seder and Last Supper. The later will be in 2009 like through a miracle – when did that happen last – celebrated directly following its biblical original! (Seder March 8th / Maundy Thursday March 9th, 2009).

What is it about:
(In brief: All goyim are lacking the archetypical experience capability of the Exodus / personal deliverance from bondage – therefore God meets them with one of His Sons [Son of God], so that they may experience personal deliverance and now also be united with the Father.)

  • The Seder meal – it forms the prelude to the biblical feast for the memory of Israel‘s exodus from Egypt, also God‘s salvation / redemption of His people from bondage, Passah Feast or simply called Pesach (Hebrew).
  • The Exodus – it is an undeletable memory, longing and promise experienced only in an Jewish soul. Beyond the Seder there exists a weekly memorial day, the Shabbat (the eternal sign between Jews and God, Exodus 31:12-14), who offered His beloved and chosen people from God among others also for the purpose to remember consciously His salvation from the Egyptian bondage (Deut 15:5). Passah like Shabbat are also a guaranty for the soulish staying awake in an exclusive love relationship in an eternal covenant of salvation, experience and promise of God with regard to His exclusive and holy people. The Archetype Exodus is an – because experienced by no other people on their own body – only to be experienced and remembered event by Jews!
  • The Last Supper – it is also called Holy Supper, is a remembrance instituted by Jesus (Mt. 26:26-28) for the New Covenant in context with the Seder Feast. Unfortunately, through moving the Passah Feast to the unbiblical Easter Feast, the original meaning of the Seder has been lost. Unbiblical because, Jesus Christ, obedient to the instruction (hebr. Tora), kept on that evening only God‘s order (hebr. Seder) together with His disciples, and not a future replacement feast for Pesach initiated.

As the Church, respectively her precursor, included the letters in the Bible canon, looked the laws and biblical feasts since increasingly so, as if they would be legalistic forms of the Jews. And while Jesus postulated in the Gospels: „Salvation comes from the Jews“, the nations (Gentiles, heathen or in the Bible often also summarized as „Egyptians“) in the course of Church history through mis – interpretations of those Epistles more and more as justified and the Jews became the mission target. Only in 1965 accepted the declaration „Nostre Aetate“ of the 2. Vatikan Council again Judaism as an independent religion, in which the Christian faith is rooted. But than in 2007, the Pope permitted again the precouncil Good Friday intercession, in which after the „Last Communion“ on Maundy Thursday it was anew allowed to pray for the „blindfolded, impenitent and perfidious (faithless, unbelieving) Jews“.

Even to the early Apostles was a assigned an superior teaching authority. In Judaism however their is no higher teaching authority, because the ONLY teaching authority is God Himself. Whilst Jesus in the Gospels refers exclusively and constantly to God as the ONLY ONE, i.e. „You shall worship the Lord, your God, and serve him alone“, so from the 2nd century onward increasingly he himself was handed down as the ONE Saviour. The next irritation came through the uprising of „Replacement theology“. Did these developments reflect the spirit of Jesus? Here may everyone draw his own, liberating conclusions, that lead to a biblically mature, responsible dialogue in the Christian-Jewish cooperation. Apropos – as far as the Exodus and resulting deliverance are concerned – the word „deliverance“ has – as a Rabbi explained us recently – in the Hebrew the same letter as the word „responsibility“. The latter merely with the letter Aleph up front, that stands for ONE.

Already from the beginning of the 4th Century was Judaism finally replaced, at least till today, as root by Christianity. The new root was named Constantine (acc. „Paulinus“ Weekly News in Bistum Trier, special edition of June 2nd, 2007: „Recollection of the roots – With Constantine was the Christian Occident founded / Trier remembers the great Emporer“). First result of the „Constantine turning point“ were new laws, which forbad keeping all customs and ways of the „Hebrews“ – first of all it was tried to eliminate the soulish participation of memories about the Exodus from Egypt (also among Christians).

„One of the laws denied the Jews even the spreading of their religion, at that time Judaism stopped to be a proselyting religion. Not only that Judaism was not allowed to recruit proselyts, a law from 315 forbad even conversion to Judaism by threat and execution of death by fire.“ (citation Marita Sara Meyer, paragraph I. The Establishment of Christianity lead to first Schism).

But, and that is the miracle, the Jews kept their redemption from bondage, in heart and in Spirit. It was founded by God and it remained inseparable connected with God till today. Enviable, or? And the Gojim, where did they remain? God met them in one of His son, so that they may experience also personally salvation and be now united with the Father as well. But, as we were just reading, it was than – like once with the Jews – quickly again an end, less through Constantine, then through their own decision, like i.e. the Feast of Shabbat moved to Sunday and thus desecrated, or even the mind alienation of further from God biblically determined feasts. Is it therefore not a wonder, which we should welcome with all our heart, that we now, standing still at the beginning of a new millennium, can celebrate together with all Jews, and first of all the Jew Jesus, in mind and in the spirit of Seder? Is it not pure reconciliation grace, that this year the „three days and three nights in the heart of the earth“ are really existing, as pronounced by Jesus, as with Jona?

Shabbat Shalom and Hag Pesach Sameach!

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Shabbat BeSHALACH – When He Sent – Sabbath Reading and Commentary

Exodus 13:17–17:16; Judges 4:4–5:31

Abstract of the Commentary by Michael Schneider,
israel today, Jerusalem:

This week’s Torah portion tells us that Pharaoh had a change of heart after expelling the children of Israel from Egypt, leading him to chase after them. The Israelites began to panic when they saw Pharaoh’s horses galloping after them. They were quick to forget God’s powerful work and their praises turned to complaints.

Moses stood as a mediator between God and man. Yet, all he heard were the complaints of the people: “Now you let us die here in the desert!” and “Why did you let us out of Egypt?” (14:11-12).

The Midrash tells us to be careful what you say because the words of dying in the desert were fulfilled 40 years later!

The LORD gives the same answer today during times of panic and distress: “The LORD will fight for you while you keep silent” (14:14) and “Stand by and see the salvation of the LORD!”

God had His hand on His people, not allowing them to pass through the land of the Philistines, along the shores of the Mediterranean Sea (which today is the Gaza Strip where the Palestinians live). They had to go through the desert for several reasons, not only to avoid war, but also because of the threat of assimilation and influence of foreign gods.

God wanted His people to have a real change of heart, which was a 40-year journey. The goal was total surrender and dependency on the LORD! It worked best in a dry and barren desert.

God told Moses: “As for you, lift up your staff and stretch out your hand over the sea and divide it, and the sons of Israel shall go through the midst of the sea on dry land.”
X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X

Commentary by Rabbi Chaim Richman, Temple Institute Jerusalem:

X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X

From the God given staff, which previously worked wonders in Egypt through bringing the plagues and dividing the sea, Moses used it to hit a rock, pouring forth water for more than 2 million people.

Sadly, we see that even through God’s wondrous works, it didn’t bring true repentance. Just look at the manna from heaven during their days of wandering in the desert.

The manna from heaven became Daily Bread. This is also mentioned in the Lord’s Prayer, expressed in physical and spiritual terms. It becomes a daily provision, not a weekly, monthly or yearly supply (16:18).

The believer should seek the Lord in the morning daily! This also, shows that we are equal in the Lord’s eyes. On Friday, a double portion was given so they could rest on Shabbat. To remember this, we bless two pieces of hallah, braided loaves of bread eaten on Shabbat.

It’s amazing to see that only three days after praising God in the Song of Moses (the Song of the Sea), the children of Israel began grumbling again (15:22).

We find another victorious praise song in our Torah portion in Judges 4 and 5, by Deborah the judge.

So, let’s be thankful and not complain!

Shabbat Shalom

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