One Day. One G-d. One Venture.

RE’EH – Video Commentary on this Shabbat

Deuteronomy 11:26 – 16:17 || Isaiah 66:1-24

Commentary by Rabbi Chaim Richman for The Temple Institute, Jerusalem, Israel:
«As Moshe readies his people for their entry into the land of Israel and the establishment of a Torah-based just society, he introduces the concept of „the place which HaShem your G-d shall choose,“ suggesting that the location of the future Holy Temple is unknown. Yet, from the days of Adam, Avraham and Yaakov, the location of the Holy Temple has been known. Has G-d really not yet chosen the place of His Chosen House? or is G-d simply waiting for Israel to choose likewise, and build the Holy Temple?»…more:

Shabbat Shalom

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DEVARIM – Video Commentary on this Shabbat

Deuteronomy 1:1 – 3:22 || Iesaiah 1:1-27

Commentary by Rabbi Chaim Richman for The Temple Institute, Jerusalem, Israel:
«Destruction is the root of building. All new growth is nourished by the victories and defeats of the past, the previous generations. This is why Moshe begins the book of Deuteronomy with a veiled rebuke of the previous generation, and this is why it is up to our generation to rebuild the Holy Temple in Jerusalem on the foundations of the Holy Temple destroyed 2000 years ago»…more:

Shabbat Shalom

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SHELACH – Video Commentary on this Shabbat

    Please note that parashat KORACH is being read in the land of Israel this Shabbat.

Galut: „Shelach Lecha“: Numbers 13:1 – 15:41 || Joshua 2

Commentary by Rabbi Chaim Richman for The Temple Institute, Jerusalem, Israel:
«The reality which exists all around us reflects the reality that we create within our own selves, based on our trust in G-d and our openness to let Him into our hearts. A lesson learned the hard way by the spies who searched out the land of Israel»…more:

Shabbat Shalom

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Beha’alotcha – Video Commentary on this Shabbat

    Please note that parashat SHELACH is being read in the land of Israel this Shabbat.

Galut: „Beha’alotcha“: Numbers 8:1-12:16 || Zechariah 2:14 – 4:7

Commentary by Rabbi Chaim Richman for The Temple Institute, Jerusalem, Israel:
«Beha’alotcha and the art of complaining: The professional complainers in the desert turned complaining from a spontaneous response to discomfort into a premeditated attempt to change fate and flee from destiny, grumbling about everything from „my feet hurt“ to „I don’t wanna eat my manna!“»…more:

Shabbat Shalom

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SHEMINI – Video Commentary on this Shabbat

Leviticus 9:1 – 11:47; Numbers 19 || Ezekiel 36:16-38

Commentary by Rabbi Chaim Richman for The Temple Institute, Jerusalem, Israel:
«Parashat Shemini, „And it was on the eighth day… “ celebrates the arrival of the Shechinah – the Divine Presence – in the world, as „the glory of HaShem appeared to all the people“ and G-d assumed His long desired place in the desert Tabernacle, built, on His instruction, by His people Israel. Following the tragic death of Nadav and Avihu, G-d begins to instruct the people how to bring the kedushah – holiness – that His presence has magnified, into their daily lives»…more:

Shabbat Shalom

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KI TISA – Video Commentary on this Shabbat

Exodus 30:11 – 34:35 || 1 Kings 18:1-38

Commentary by Rabbi Chaim Richman for The Temple Institute, Jerusalem, Israel:
«The debacle of the golden calf is a cautionary tale about the dangers of trying to shape G-d in our image, of making G-d more compliant with our own limitations and self serving goals. G-d presides over His people on His terms, and not the other way around»…more:

Shabbat Shalom

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VAYIGASH – Video Commentary On This Shabbat

Genesis 44:18 – 47:27 || Ezechiel 37:15-28

Commentary by Rabbi Chaim Richman for The Temple Institute, Jerusalem, Israel:
«The supernal sparks flew when Yehudah approached Yosef. Ready to engage in cosmic battle for the life of Binyamin, Yehudah’s anguish turned to joy when Yosef revealed his true identity. We all share in the joy of the reconciled and reunited brothers, and in the return of Yosef to his father Yaakov. This story of reconciliation is the paradigm and blueprint for the great redemption that is to come, when the brothers will once again unite, in heart and soul and might»…more:

Shabbat Shalom

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Chanuka Lights Across the World

Chanukah News from Across the Globe »

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Once a year
heavenly light will be close to us.

Meant is not the Christ but in a very different way Jesus of whom a Jewish tradition says:
“Now it was the Feast of Dedication [Hebrew: Hanukkah] in Jerusalem, and it was winter. And Jesus walked in the temple, in Solomon’s porch.” (Gospel of John 10:22). To make a long story short, Jesus was a regular rabbi coming from Nazareth who refueled on the Temple Feast of Dedication and was about – like every other rabbi around the globe till the time being – to bring The Light into the world because “I [the LORD] have called You [Israel] in righteousness, and will hold Your hand; I will keep You and give You as a covenant to the people, as a light to the Gentiles, to open blind eyes” (Isaiah 42:6).
Sh’ma Israel:
“The LORD our God, the LORD is one. You shall love the LORD your God with all your heart, with all your soul, and with all your strength. And these words which I command you today shall be in your heart:”
Change the world, You, who are chosen! Bring My Light to the Gentiles, O Israel! That is what – like Jesus – the Lubavitcher Chassidim today do on Hanukkah on behalf of His Israel in U.S. cities and all over the nations.

It is the Jews who were chosen to open the blind eyes of the Gentiles / nations, not visa versa! Even if the church wants us to do the opposite credible – the decision and love of God, baruch HaShem, is eternal: “I will destroy on this mountain the surface of the covering cast over all people, and the veil that is spread over all nations” (Isaiah 25:7). The victory is Me – not the church. That is the story behind, that a small group of Jews (Maccabees and Jews in total compared to the world and the church) were victorious over the hundred times larger Syrian-Greek conversion heer in 164 BCE (→ Seleucid Empire), but after all in the devastated temple of God in Jerusalem was only a single pot of kosher oil for the eternal light to find. Not more than one day, this amount would have been enough oil, but by a heavenly miracle, the light burned for eight days. Which is precisely the time it took to complete the procedure for obtaining new kosher oil. Since that time celebrated all the faithful believers, religious and non-religious one, these eight days a year as Hanukkah (Hebrew: consecration / dedication), till our Second Temple was destroyed . . . by the Romans!

The same Romans had financed with the spoils of the 66 – 70 CE wars against Israel and the destruction of God’s Temple, the construction of the Colosseum from year 72 on (see German Wikipedia which is obviously not allowed to be translated in the American Wikipedia considering tourism collapse from Overseas might be) and later on founded their new religion against God, His Temple, His People, His Shabbat . . . and not least against the teachings of Jesus. . .

  • Was it Jesus who – as one of His People a model of all mankind – put Satan to flight with the words of the Holy Scriptures (Deut. 6:13): “You shall worship the LORD your God, and HIM ONLY you shall serve.” Rome made Jesus himself, of all warnings to the contrary, the God, their own Lord.
  • Did Jesus warned, „Moses [Torah] and the prophets [Neviim] to hear and obey“ in order not to arrive at „the place of eternal torment“ instead of eternal life (Luke 16:28), then Romans cultured their own scriptures, which they sanctified and in them is to read to this day, that “ therefore, since we have such hope, we use great boldness of speech – unlike Moses, who put a veil over his face so that the children of Israel could not look steadily at the end of what was passing away. But their minds were blinded [instead of that Jews shall open the eyes of the Gentiles – see above]. For until this day the same veil remains unlifted in the reading of the Old Testament, because the veil is taken away in Christ. But even to this day, when Moses is read, a veil lies on their heart. Nevertheless when one turns to the Lord, the veil is taken away. Now the Lord is the Spirit; and where the Spirit of the Lord is, there is liberty [such as to murder Israel in Jewish-Roman Wars, Crusades or Luther’s Reichskristallnacht] But we all, with unveiled face, beholding as in a mirror the glory of the Lord, are being transformed into the same image from glory to glory, just as by the Spirit of the Lord. “(2 Cor. 3:12 ff).

But Adonai, Adon Olam, remains the same (Isaiah 60), He yesterday . . .
. . . and You One in Him today on Hanukkah? . . .
“Arise, shine; for Your light has come! And the glory of the LORD is risen upon You. For behold, the darkness shall cover the earth, and deep darkness the people; but the LORD will arise over You, and His glory will be seen upon You. The Gentiles shall come to Your light, and kings to the brightness of your rising.”
. . . wherever You are!

Hag Hanukkah Sameach
Eric C. Martienssen

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VAYISHLACH – Video Commentary On This Shabbath

Genesis 32:4 – 36:43 || Hosea 12:13 – 14:10; Obadiah

Commentary by Rabbi Chaim Richman for The Temple Institute, Jerusalem, Israel:
«Yaakov avinu, with true humility, (not false), asked of G-d His protection from his brother Esau, not as a reward for his own merits, (of which he possessed many), but simply as an expression of G-d’s unreserved and outright loving kindness»…more:

Shabbat Shalom

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DEVARIM – Shabbat Video Commentary

Deuteronomy 1:1 – 3:22 || Isaiah 1:1-27

Commentary by Rabbi Chaim Richman for The Temple Institute, Jerusalem, Israel:
«The Book of Deuteronomy is made up entirely of Moshe’s own words, spoke directly from his heart, which itself was filled with the voice of HaShem. Moshe’s words of gentle rebuke and steadfast encouragement for his people still ring true and relevant today. It is our duty to open our hearts and our ears to the words of Moshe, our master»…more:

Shabbat Shalom

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