One Day. One G-d. One Venture.

Parashat Shabbat LECH LECHA – Readings and Video Commentary

Genesis 12:1–17:27; Isaiah 40:27–41:16

Video Commentary by Rabbi Chaim Richman, The Temple Institute, Jerusalem:

°And the Lord said to Abram, „Go forth from your land and from your birthplace and from your father’s house, to the land that I will show you. And I will make you into a great nation, and I will bless you, and I will aggrandize your name, and you shall be a blessing. And I will bless those who bless you, and the one who curses you I will curse, and all the families of the earth shall be blessed in you.“ What makes a great nation? A nation whose people seek to be like Avraham, the man who sought the One True G-d, and made His presence known to mankind.. . beginning of the Jewish People…“
Listen to his entire commentary:

Shabbat Shalom !

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SHOFTIM – No justice in Germany again

„Shoftim“: Deuteronomy 16:18 till 21:9; Isaiah 51:12 till 52:12
Commentary by Eric Martienssen

Firstly, the Torah portion Shoftim of cause should be read. To make this a little more convenient for you, we found the entire reading summarized in this video about Judges (Shoftim) and the Jew’s call for „Justice, Justice“…

And now, second, a few verses out of this weeks Haftorah (here Isaiah 52) but what a blessing, what a future:
„Awake, awake; put on thy strength, O Zion; put on thy beautiful garments, O Jerusalem, the holy city: for henceforth there shall no more come into thee the uncircumcised and the unclean… For thus saith the Lord GOD, My people went down aforetime into Egypt to sojourn there; and the Assyrian oppressed them without cause… How beautiful upon the mountains are the feet of him that bringeth good tidings, that publisheth peace; that bringeth good tidings of good, that publisheth salvation; that saith unto Zion, Thy God reigneth! Thy watchmen shall lift up the voice; with the voice together shall they sing: for they shall see eye to eye, when the LORD shall bring again Zion… The LORD hath made bare his holy arm in the eyes of all the nations; and all the ends of the earth shall see the salvation of our God… For ye shall not go out with haste, nor go by flight: for the LORD will go before you; and the God of Israel will be your reward.“

But now listen to this words of Reuben Ebrahimoff in the video commentary by „Haftorahman“, telling of the coming Messiah:


Shabbat Shalom

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Shabbat MIKETZ Hanukkah Readings and Commentary

Hallel
Genesis 41:1 – 44:17; Numbers 7:48-59;
Zechariah 2:14 – 4:7

Abstract of Commentary by Michael Schneider, Jerusalem:
In Chapter 41 we read about Joseph’s divine gift of interpreting dreams, including Pharaoh’s nightmare of the seven healthy cows and seven weak cows, which represented seven prosperous years and seven years of drought and famine.

GSI: On Shabbat Hanukah – this year the Mikez / or Miketz Shabbat within Festival of Lights – the Haftarah reading from Zechariah is inserted, “behold, there is a lampstand of solid gold with a bowl on top of it, and on the stand seven lamps [eight on →Hanukkah – Change the World] with seven pipes to the seven lamps. Two olive trees are by it, one at the right of the bowl and the other at its left:

Now, after two years in prison, Joseph was transferred from the dungeon to the Royal palace. This was out of the ordinary, but that’s the way the LORD works when He intervenes. Just like during Exodus, after hundreds of years in slavery, the Hebrews went from being mistreated slaves to a victorious nation in less than 24 hours.

When Joseph was called he made it clear from the beginning that he was a vessel of the Almighty God of Israel (41:25). Do we give God the credit he deserves or take it for ourselves?

With Joseph’s interpretation, Egypt could prepare for the years of drought and so the ‘abundance became the reserve’ (41:34-36).

Joseph was then given the name ‘Zaphenath-Paneah’, meaning ‘Bread of Life’ in ancient-Egyptian. He saved the entire Egyptian empire. Salvation was found in verse 55: “Go to Joseph; whatever he says to you, you shall do.” Bread today is His Word!

Joseph became a Savior to the Gentiles first and then to the Jews because his brothers rejected him. We read in verse 40, “… Only the throne (of Pharaoh) would be greater than you.” Now when the dream the hated Joseph was telling them came true, his brothers bowed down to him as foreseen. Joseph’s time in Egypt, from the beginning was in God’s hand. Not only from saving Egypt, but also – in the end – his father Jacob (Israel) from death of famine.

Joseph like his father Jacob was separated for more than 20 painful years from his father’s home to accomplish a godly task. This Torah portion teaches us that we need to see things through God’s eyes as part of the ‘big picture’ in his plan of Salvation. Even smuggling money and the ‘goblet of the king’ in the sacks of the brothers and blaming them are sadly still anti-Semitic waves, making the Jewish people the scapegoat.

All things served one goal and purpose and that is drawing them closer to Him and protecting them from assimilation and returning home to the land of their forefathers symbolized by sitting at the table of Joseph. In our Torah portion we learn of Joseph’s second weeping (first was in the ditch) when he ‘lifted his eyes and saw his brother Benjamin, his mother’s son… Joseph hurried out for he was deeply stirred (origin in the Hebrew: overwhelmed with mercies – rahamim) over his brother, and he sought a place to weep; and he entered his chamber and wept there’ (43:29-30).

Shabbat Shalom and Hanukkah Sameach

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The Christian Church and their God Paul

As one of our warmest tasks we – God’s Sabbath International – consider to make the Eternal of Israel distinguishable from the gods of the Christian churches „so that you live“ (in eternity, Deut. 30:19)! When would be the time to separate the church from their worst idol, Paul, better chosen then this week, the first week of a new Hebrew month (Shvat), the Torah portion “Bo” and the fist Mitzvah ever?

Kirche am Ende

Church at the End

Sure, the first day of the month was the last Thursday, so in the synagogues (only substitute at home) the normal reading for the beginning of the month had been read, Numeri 28:1-15. But if, as a few months ago, the first of the month, our Rosh Chodesh, falls on a Shabbat at least the regular Haftarah of this Shabbat has to be replaced through the reading of the prophetic last chapter of Isaiah (66:1 to 24) where God declares: (17) “Those who consecrate and purify themselves to go into the gardens, following one who is among those who eat the flesh of pigs, rats and other unclean thing – they will meet their end together with the one they follow.” You know, that is very specific since those who eat flesh of pigs cannot be found among the Semites, neither Ismaelites nor Israelites, so that only Christians are meant here. But how comes that Christians eat pork, when there supposed Christ invariably kept all the commandments of the Torah? Can it be that the supposed Christianity has nothing to do with the supposed Christ – for the Rabbi from Nazareth was a Jew, and so was his teachings, a pure Jewish Torah scholar liness, it inevitably must have been someone else to have reversed his teaching later into the opposite. Ergo the God of Christianity, the God of the Christians, the one they follow in reality, not Jesus of Nazareth but Paul, and he was it who allowed them to “eat flesh of pigs so they will meet their end together with the one they follow.”
But later on “from one New Moon to another and from one Shabbat to another, all mankind will come and bow down before Me,” says the Lord. And they will go out and look on the dead bodies of those who rebelled against Me.”

Back to the Shabbat directly after this year’s New Moon of month Shvat which was Sabbath BO. And in the readings of this Shabbat BO the great hope for the nations is laying out. Not only a great hope but also the only one . . . if they, “as a mixed multitude” up to the only One, “Echad” (also Ehad), and His Only Once, His People:

    (Exodus 12:38-49) A mixed multitude went up [Aliyah] with them also, and flocks and herds – a great deal of livestock. And they baked unleavened cakes of the dough which they had brought out of Egypt; for it was not leavened, because they were driven out of Egypt and could not wait, nor had they prepared provisions for themselves. Now the sojourn of the children of Israel who lived in Egypt was four hundred and thirty years. And it came to pass at the end of the four hundred and thirty years – on that very same day – it came to pass that all the armies of the Lord went out from the land of Egypt. It is a night of solemn observance to the Lord for bringing them out of the land of Egypt. This is that night of the Lord, a solemn observance for all the children of Israel throughout their generations. And the Lord said to Moses and Aaron, “This is the ordinance of the Passover: No foreigner shall eat it. But every man’s servant who is bought for money, when you have circumcised him, then he may eat it. A sojourner and a hired servant shall not eat it. In one house it shall be eaten; you shall not carry any of the flesh outside the house, nor shall you break one of its bones. All the congregation of Israel shall keep it. And when a stranger dwells with you and wants to keep the Passover to the Lord, let all his males be circumcised, and then let him come near and keep it; and he shall be as a native of the land. For no uncircumcised person shall eat it. One law shall be for the native-born and for the stranger who dwells among you.

But the really interesting for Israel – and especially for the church, the Christians, those who will meet their end together with the one they follow if they don’t separate themselves from their God of all lies, Paul – is commanded before the exodus, the very first two Mitzvoth (commandments), directly placed between the ninth and the last plague for the goyim / Egypt. And the very first two Mitzvoth are the blood of the passover lamb and the blood of circumcision. “Prior to their redemption” the Jews should first and foremost remember once again the mitzvah which they had forgotten to observe during the last two hundred years of their slavery . . . Similarly, the Christians and their church will have to bleed “prior to their redemption” (re-cognition of the commandments of God), which they did not observe during the 2000 years, in which they worshiped their idols like Paul.
God wanted “His people” to have a real change of heart, which was a 40-year journey. The goal was total surrender and dependency on the Lord! It worked best in a dry and barren desert. God told Moses: “As for you, lift up your staff and stretch out your hand over the sea and divide it, and the sons of Israel shall go through the midst of the sea on dry land…” read Parashat BeShalach »

Shabbat Shalom
Eric C. Martienssen

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Shabbat Vayeshev Readings and Commentary

Genesis 37:1 – 40:23; Amos 2:6 – 3:8

Abstract of the Commentary by
Michael Schneider, israel today, Jerusalem:

In our Torah portion, ‘Va‘Yeshev,’ last year, we discussed Joseph as a prototype of the Messiah. We saw the parallels between Messiah Ben-Joseph and the Joseph’s life. Through Joseph’s brother’s rejection, he was sent to Egypt where he attained status of being second to Pharaoh and regarded as a deity. The Egyptians also used the concept of the trinity with three Pharaoh’s. He became a stranger to his brothers because he was now ‘Egyptian’ and they could not recognize him.

David, like Joseph has a similar story. Both were shepherds and despised by their brothers. Samuel anointed David as king at 17, but it wasn’t until age 30 when he reigned over Israel. Joseph’s life in Egypt began at 17, but he didn’t sit ‘at the right hand’ of Pharaoh until 30. Both, Joseph and David, were sons from another mother, which Jewish scholars claim was the reason for David’s ‘red’ look and why “Israel (Jacob) loved Joseph more than any of his other sons…”

Chapter 38 interrupts with a different story: the deceitful affair between Judah and Tamar, his daughter-in-law. Judah, in the chapter before intervenes and saves his brother’s life (37:26-27). One interpretation says it’s the reason his descendants are of the royal line in the kingdom of Israel. Judah (where the word ‘Jew – yehudi’ comes from) desired for his sons to produce offspring so they could continue his forefather’s blessing.

When Judah’s oldest son, Er, passed away, his wife Tamar was given to Onan. “Lie with your brother’s wife and fulfill your duty to her as a brother-in-law to produce offspring for your brother” (38:8). But, after Onan died, Judah told Tamar to go back to her father’s home until the third son Shela grew up.

Many years passed and the agreement was forgotten. But, when Tamar saw her father-in-law she sought revenge. She took off her widow’s clothes (38:14), which were a sign she was waiting for Judah to fulfill his promise, and covered her face so he couldn’t recognize her. Once protected from evil she was now covered with the mask of sin and deceit. Out of rage and revenge she dressed like a prostitute and Judah fell into ‘her snare’ (Proverbs 7).

Once her sin was made known, Judah confessed, “She is right, I am to blame.” Tamar went on to give birth to – again – twins, Peretz and Zerach (38:25 – 26). Again, the younger (Peretz) struggled to be born first, like with Esau and Jacob.

Another similarity we find is that Tamar shows Judah his three belongings: his ring, cord and staff. She says, “Recognize please…” (Hebrew haker-na; 38:25), which reminds us of the same words used in the chapter before as Judah himself deceived his father with Joseph’s coat and said: “Recognize please…” (37:32). What Judah did to his father through deceit Tamar did to him.

We can ask ourselves why the LORD allowed the marriage to be ‘legitimate’ even though it was incest and allow the heirs to be a part of the Messianic line of David? God allowed it to happen! Tamar even became one of the four ‘non-Jewish’ mothers along with Rahab, Ruth and Bathsheba.

Hag Hanukkah Sameach (HanukkahCurrent Themes)

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Parashat VaYikra – And he called – Shabbat Reading and Commentary

Lecha Dodi, Shabbat Song:

Leviticus 1:1 – 5:26 and Isaiah 43:21-44:23

Commentary by Michael Schneider, israel today, Jerusalem:
This week we entered the Hebrew month Nisan that according to the Bible is the first month of the year. Meaning that we had this week the Biblical New Year, and unfortunetly not from many it is noticed because the Jews today are going after the rabbinical tradition and celebrating New Year at the 1st Tishrei, Rosh HaShana (original Feast of the sound of the trumpets).

In the word “Nisan” we find the Hebrew word “Nes” which means “miracle”. Indeed, this is a special month in which the greatest of all miracles took place for the Jewish people: the freedom and redemption of the Jewish people from slavery in Egypt – that’s why we remember it even more than 3300 years later throu the feast of Passover. May this “Nisan” truly be a month of miracles for everyone in all aspects of life.

Not only had we started a new month and year but also a new book of the Torah: Leviticus that is called also the “Torat Cohanim” the Law of the Priests where we find all the strict ordinaces of services at the temple, sanctuary (tabernacle) and sacrifies.

Although it is a not-easy book, and even some will say an irrelevant because we don’t have a temple and sacrifies ritual anymore, I urge all Believers to read it in a spiritual sense. Is our body not His sanctuary and temple? Should it and our life not be a living sacrifice to our LORD?

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Greeting Card PURIM – for Jews and all who would join them

Purim 2010: February 28 – March 1. For technical reasons we cannot bring this year’s Purim greeting card online in time. On our homepage, however, you get an impression of this year’s sujet. Write us an e-mail. Then we will send you this picture in high definition, that you can print it out and send it in time to your friends.
The Text is: …for Jews and all who would join them PURIM

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Shabbat Hanukkah and VA’YESHEV – He, Jacob, lived – Reading and Commentary

Hallel; Genesis 37:1 – 40:23; Numbers 7:1-17; Numbers 28:9-15; Zechariah 2:14 – 4.7

Abstract of the Commentary by Michael Schneider,
israel today, Jerusalem:

In our Torah portion, ‘Va‘Yeshev,’ last year, we discussed Joseph. Through Joseph’s brother’s rejection, he was sent to Egypt where he attained status of being second to Pharaoh and regarded as a deity. The Egyptians also used the concept of the trinity with three Pharaoh’s. He became a stranger to his brothers because he was now ‘Egyptian’ and they could not recognize him.

David, like Joseph has a similar story. Both were shepherds and despised by their brothers. Samuel anointed David as king at 17, but it wasn’t until age 30 when he reigned over Israel. Joseph’s life in Egypt began at 17, but he didn’t sit ‘at the right hand’ of Pharaoh until 30. Both, Joseph and David, were sons from another mother, which Jewish scholars claim was the reason for David’s ‘red’ look and why “Israel (Jacob) loved Joseph more than any of his other sons…”

Chapter 38 interrupts with a different story: the deceitful affair between Judah and Tamar, his daughter-in-law. Judah, in the chapter before intervenes and saves his brother’s life (37:26-27). One interpretation says it’s the reason his descendants are of the royal line in the kingdom of Israel. Judah (where the word ‘Jew – yehudi’ comes from) desired for his sons to produce offspring so they could continue his forefather’s blessing.

When Judah’s oldest son, Er, passed away, his wife Tamar was given to Onan. “Lie with your brother’s wife and fulfill your duty to her as a brother-in-law to produce offspring for your brother” (38:8). But, after Onan died, Judah told Tamar to go back to her father’s home until the third son Shela grew up.

Many years passed and the agreement was forgotten. But, when Tamar saw her father-in-law she sought revenge. She took off her widow’s clothes (38:14), which were a sign she was waiting for Judah to fulfill his promise, and covered her face so he couldn’t recognize her. Once protected from evil she was now covered with the mask of sin and deceit. Out of rage and revenge she dressed like a prostitute and Judah fell into ‘her snare’ (Proverbs 7).

Once her sin was made known, Judah confessed, “She is right, I am to blame.” Tamar went on to give birth to – again – twins, Peretz and Zerach (38:25 – 26). Again, the younger (Peretz) struggled to be born first, like with Esau and Jacob.

Another similarity we find is that Tamar shows Judah his three belongings: his ring, cord and staff. She says, “Recognize please…” (Hebrew haker-na; 38:25), which reminds us of the same words used in the chapter before as Judah himself deceived his father with Joseph’s coat and said: “Recognize please…” (37:32). What Judah did to his father through deceit Tamar did to him.

We can ask ourselves why the LORD allowed the marriage to be ‘legitimate’ even though it was incest and allow the heirs to be a part of the Messianic line of David? God allowed it to happen! Tamar even became one of the four ‘non-Jewish’ mothers along with Rahab, Ruth and Bathsheba.

That was answered in our reading in Zechariah 2:14-16: “Shout and be glad, O Daughter of Zion. For I am coming, and I will live among you,“ declares the LORD… „The LORD will inherit Judah as his portion in the holy land and will again choose Jerusalem.”

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Hanukkah – Seasons Greetings for the Holy Feast of Lights

Seasons Greetings, Peace – Yearning after the Names of GodSeasons Greetings, personal stories as Greetings for these Seasons instead of posting cards with heathen Christmas motives, is as I find, more than just a wonderful tradition of our Anglo-Saxon friends. It is suitable to the season, the contemplative time between the Feast of Lights „Hanukkah“ and the heartily expected new – a promise pointing towards the fulfillment of our longing for peace. God, what did You have in mind with this?

Eternal peace between Christians and Jews, or even more? …Meditate about holy matters! Suddenly stands that, what belongs to God (in the Bible called „holy“), in opposition to what mankind made for herself, made herself sanctified. To celebrate my self-made feasts, but am I happy with it, without God? HIS feasts – for Ever holy – HE has called them „moed“ in the Bible/Tanach, which means translated stated appointments. Was it not me myself, who stated new times, on which I wanted to have „a date“ with HIM and wonder now, that HE does not turn up and simply no peace will enter me – and where is the „peace on Earth“?

HE is already here, in you, everything premeditated from the glorious Creator God before all time, in unsearchable love, if we just want to recognize the beauty of His thoughts. For instance, there is Friday – Shabbat – Sunday. Friday has been sanctified by the Ishmaelites to be their holy day, the Christians the Sunday. And in between lies – some day reconciling – the Holy Day of God. Actually from the beginning, as the creation history (Genesis 2:3) shows, He gave „complete rest“ (hebr. Shabbat) for all mankind. Could one not conclude, that Christianity moved as much away from God, as the Ishmaelites? Listen to God:

„In that day there will be a highway from Egypt to Assyria, and the Assyrian will come into Egypt and the Egyptian into Assyria, and the Egyptians will serve with the Assyrians. In that day Israel will be one of three with Egypt and Assyria—a blessing in the midst of the land, whom the LORD of hosts shall bless, saying, “Blessed is Egypt My people, and Assyria the work of My hands, and Israel My inheritance.” (Isaiah 19:23-25) – New Jerusalem, did you not feel it? Is „you longing“ not even finding home in every name of God? Pastor Rolf Piller had once the joy to translate some of them (Names of God, PDF).

We wish you a peaceful season, a shining kind light, a soul that touches your longing desire and shares it with you, as well as a blessed start into 2008.

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Shabbat Ekev – Sabbath Readings and Video Commentary

Deuteronomy 7:12 till 11:25; Haftara: Isaiah 49:14 till 51:3

How is it possible that the Torah commands us something which is depending upon a person’s heard, depending upon a person’s emotion? Can God command us how to feel? The love that every Jew feels for God is part of us, is part of the essences of who we are, is very close to the surface!
Watch video commentary by Rabbi Richman from The Temple Institute:

Shabbat Shalom

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