One Day. One G-d. One Venture.

Open Letter to Luther Germany denying Israelis

This week’s parashat (וישלח- Genesis 32:4-36:43) mentions „Israel“ for the first time in the Holy Bibel (in difference to the world: Genesis – 2 Chronicles Chapter 36, only)! Since then, the Christian-Roman world is trying to erase precisely this „Israel“. For a century, by financing the terrorism of the Palestinians, „for you, brethren, became followers of the churches of God which in Judaea are in Christ Jesus: for you also have suffered the same things of your own countrymen, even as they have of the Jews: Who both killed the Lord Jesus, and their own prophets, and have persecuted us; and they please not God, and are contrary to all men“, so their new bible, the so called New Testament, so it incites against Jews (1 Thess. 2:14-15). And the Jews know nothing of all this?

Dear Israel !
On one side you have my grateful and warmest thanks for this video…

On the other hand, I wonder when the Israelis will wake up to realize that the Jew labeling Israel Boycott of the EU is just another (and this time politically correct) brick in the German Wall leading to

    „Kristallnacht II“ – now called: „Reformation Night 2017“,

Israel: save Germany from itself – Stop this Luther festival ultimately in time before its High Holidays end!

Israel: save Germany from itself – Stop this Luther festival ultimately in time before its High Holidays end!

the official World Ceremony of the „Luther Decade“, October 31, 2017?

Click picture postcard for download, storage, printing and spread out a million times per email and Internet!

Have you really never heard about German religious leaders who are politicians in one, never heard about the matter in fact that President Gauck is a Lutheran pastor, Merkel a Lutheran pastor’s daughter, Secretary of State Steinmeier a presidential board member of the Lutheran Church, the opposition leader, Katrin Goering-Eckardt a former president of the Lutheran Church Synod and that the largest publisher in Germany (so called Israel-patroness Friede Springer) is financing the searing Luther Decade to the honor of Martin Luther? This Martin Luther whose Birthday the Germans where celebrating in the night from November 9 to November 10, 1938! It was Martin Luther who called the Germans to set the Jews and their Synagogues on fire with his words:

„Firstly, that their synagogues or schools be set on fire and, what may not burn, be heaped over with earth, so that no human being could see a stone or cinder for ever. And such should be done to honour our Lord and Christianity, so that God may see that we are Christians.“

Above mentioned German leaders who are also leading the EU and the boycott against you, unlike you they do know exactly that their Lutheran World Federation (LWF) and their World Council of Churches (WCC) is finally financing the Paletinian terror. By the way there had never been an ethnic group called „Nazis“, they were always Germans. And you do not even know the origin of the boycott, almost denying it, making gorgeous videos while the reality of Luther Decade hurries to it’s fiery climax?

Please Google-Search and translate our various German articles on this:
– Kristallnacht: man feierte in Luthers Geburtstag- Gods Sabbath
– Jud Sorgefrei: Kristallnacht II- Gods Sabbath
– Martinsfeuer: Nachkommen der Juden wissen wieder von nichts – Gods Sabbath

. . . and our English article: Kristallnacht LUTHER DECADE Pogromnacht

Shalom and warm regards,
Yours Eric C. Martienssen

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The Kaddish

Today on Yom Hazikaron, the Day Of Remembrance for the fallen soldiers of Israel and victims of terrorism, e.g. civilian victims of Palestinian political violence, the Kaddish is explained by Israel Yaoz (see below) But first the pure text of the prayer is provided:

May the great Name of God be exalted and sanctified, throughout the world, which he has created according to his will. May his Kingship be established in your lifetime and in your days, and in the lifetime of the entire household of Israel, swiftly and in the near future; and say, Amen.
May his great name be blessed, forever and ever.
Blessed, praised, glorified, exalted, extolled, honored elevated and lauded be the Name of the holy one, Blessed is he- above and beyond any blessings and hymns, Praises and consolations which are uttered in the world; and say Amen. May there be abundant peace from Heaven, and life, upon us and upon all Israel; and say, Amen.

This is a short summary of what Avigdor Shinan, Professor of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, wrote in 2009 (ISBN 978-965-13-2082-8) about one of the most important prayers in Judaism, the Kaddisch..

Even most of the non-religeous Jews pray the Kaddish though they often may not fully understand its implications. The Kaddish is the prayer for the dead.

It is in the Arameic language, while almost every other traditional Jewish prayer is in biblical Hebrew. It begins with: „Be His name exalted and sanctified!“ Everybody knows which name is meant here, but the holy name itself is never being mentioned. Instead it is represented by „Adonai“ (= my LORD).

Every prayer in the Sidur is related to biblical events or biblical relations, but not so this prayer.

In the Kaddish there is no word mentioning the dead, or death, or pain, or yearning or suffering. It is all about gloryfing the name of God and His justice in all of His decisions, whether they bring to us good or even suffering.

In the Mishna, the „Verbal Torah“ of the second century C.E., there is no mentioning of what developed later into the Kaddish.

To his own surprise, Prof. Shinan found a first hint to the beginnings of the Kaddish in the Sermon on the Mount of Jeshua: „When you pray, go into your room, close the door and pray to your Father, who is unseen. Then your Father, who sees what is done in secret, will reward you… This, then, is how you should pray: ‚Our Father in heaven, hallowed be your name …“ (Mattew 6:6-9).

Most likely Jesus was teaching this prayer to his disciples in Arameic. It is a very personal prayer between man and his creator and was used in different variations. It was „not a fixed formula, and not a community prayer for use the synagoge or in religious congregations, and so it was not necessity to be mentioned in the Mishna“.

I don´t want to go into further details of the long and complicated history of the Kaddish in the past, but I want to sum up, what the Kaddish is today: It is the standard prayer of the bereaved for children, for parents, for close relatives or for other loved ones, to commemorate them, and to pray for their eternal salvation.

A strong influence to the formation and practice of the Kaddish has come from the hard times of cruel persecution, during the crusades and the many pogroms. In these traumatic events it granted some comfort and consolation to the suffering, in praising the holy name of God who is just even when man does not understand it. There might have been even some christian influence, like some commemorating ceremonies and the custom of lighting candles for the dead.

May be it was not so much the unfamiliar (Arameic) words of the Kaddish, or its theological meaning, but much more so some subconscious feeling of being in a comforting communion with the whole people of Israel, her long history of suffering, and with her strong collective hope for a better future, what made the Kaddish into such a strong tradition. The soft murmuring of this prayer might also have had a genuine comforting influence on the mood of the bereaved.

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SHIRAT Shabbat BeShalach- and Tu biShvat Commentary

Exodus 13:17–17:16; Judges 4:4–5:31

Abstract of the Commentary by Michael Schneider, Jerusalem:
This week’s Torah portion tells us that Pharaoh had a change of heart after expelling the children of Israel from Egypt, leading him to chase after them. The Israelites began to panic when they saw Pharaoh’s horses galloping after them. They were quick to forget God’s powerful work and their praises turned to complaints.

Moses stood as a mediator between God and man. Yet, all he heard were the complaints of the people: “Now you let us die here in the desert!” and “Why did you let us out of Egypt?” (14:11-12).

The Midrash tells us to be careful what you say because the words of dying in the desert were fulfilled 40 years later!

The LORD gives the same answer today during times of panic and distress: “The LORD will fight for you while you keep silent” (14:14) and “Stand by and see the salvation of the LORD!”

God had His hand on His people, not allowing them to pass through the land of the Philistines, along the shores of the Mediterranean Sea (which today is the Gaza Strip where the Palestinians live). They had to go through the desert for several reasons, not only to avoid war, but also because of the threat of assimilation and influence of foreign gods.

God wanted His people to have a real change of heart, which was a 40-year journey. The goal was total surrender and dependency on the Lord! It worked best in a dry and barren desert.

God told Moses: “As for you, lift up your staff and stretch out your hand over the sea and divide it, and the sons of Israel shall go through the midst of the sea on dry land.”

Commentary by Rabbi Chaim Richman, Temple Institute, Jerusalem:
When G-d parted the waters of the Sea of Reeds He also parted for Israel the curtains of illusion allowing them to see the true reality – a timeless moment of recognition of the Divine light surrounding and permeating our world.

This Shabbat we will also celebrate The New Year For Trees > Chabad: Tu B’Shevat >

From the God given staff, which previously worked wonders in Egypt through bringing the plagues and dividing the sea, Moses used it to hit a rock, pouring forth water for more than 2 million people.

Sadly, we see that even through God’s wondrous works, it didn’t bring true repentance. Just look at the manna from heaven during their days of wandering in the desert.

The manna from heaven became Daily Bread. It becomes a daily provision, not a weekly, monthly or yearly supply (16:18).

The believer should seek the Lord in the morning daily! This also, shows that we are equal in the Lord’s eyes. On Friday, a double portion was given so they could rest on Shabbat. To remember this, we bless two pieces of hallah, braided loaves of bread eaten on Shabbat.

It’s amazing to see that only three days after praising God in the Song of Moses (the Song of the Sea), the children of Israel began grumbling again (15:22).

We find another victorious praise song in our Torah portion in Judges 4 and 5, by Deborah the judge.

So, let’s be thankful and not complain!

Shabbat Shalom

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Shabbat Parashat BeShalach Readings and Commentary

Exodus 13:17–17:16; Judges 4:4–5:31

Abstract of the Commentary by Michael Schneider, Jerusalem:
This week’s Torah portion tells us that Pharaoh had a change of heart after expelling the children of Israel from Egypt, leading him to chase after them. The Israelites began to panic when they saw Pharaoh’s horses galloping after them. They were quick to forget God’s powerful work and their praises turned to complaints.

Moses stood as a mediator between God and man. Yet, all he heard were the complaints of the people: “Now you let us die here in the desert!” and “Why did you let us out of Egypt?” (14:11-12).

The Midrash tells us to be careful what you say because the words of dying in the desert were fulfilled 40 years later!

The LORD gives the same answer today during times of panic and distress: “The LORD will fight for you while you keep silent” (14:14) and “Stand by and see the salvation of the LORD!”

God had His hand on His people, not allowing them to pass through the land of the Philistines, along the shores of the Mediterranean Sea (which today is the Gaza Strip where the Palestinians live). They had to go through the desert for several reasons, not only to avoid war, but also because of the threat of assimilation and influence of foreign gods.

God wanted His people to have a real change of heart, which was a 40-year journey. The goal was total surrender and dependency on the Lord! It worked best in a dry and barren desert.

God told Moses: “As for you, lift up your staff and stretch out your hand over the sea and divide it, and the sons of Israel shall go through the midst of the sea on dry land.”

Commentary by Rabbi Chaim Richman, Temple Institute, Jerusalem:
When G-d parted the waters of the Sea of Reeds He also parted for Israel the curtains of illusion allowing them to see the true reality – a timeless moment of recognition of the Divine light surrounding and permeating our world.

From the God given staff, which previously worked wonders in Egypt through bringing the plagues and dividing the sea, Moses used it to hit a rock, pouring forth water for more than 2 million people.

Sadly, we see that even through God’s wondrous works, it didn’t bring true repentance. Just look at the manna from heaven during their days of wandering in the desert.

The manna from heaven became Daily Bread. It becomes a daily provision, not a weekly, monthly or yearly supply (16:18).

The believer should seek the Lord in the morning daily! This also, shows that we are equal in the Lord’s eyes. On Friday, a double portion was given so they could rest on Shabbat. To remember this, we bless two pieces of hallah, braided loaves of bread eaten on Shabbat.

It’s amazing to see that only three days after praising God in the Song of Moses (the Song of the Sea), the children of Israel began grumbling again (15:22).

We find another victorious praise song in our Torah portion in Judges 4 and 5, by Deborah the judge.

So, let’s be thankful and not complain!

Shabbat Shalom

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Shabbat Reading and Commentary for week 7, 2009, (Feb. 7th) Sabbath BeSHALACH – When He Sent:

Exodus 13:17–17:16; Judges 4:4–5:31
By Michael Schneider, israel today, Jerusalem

Commentary:
This week’s Torah portion tells us that Pharaoh had a change of heart after expelling the children of Israel from Egypt, leading him to chase after them. The Israelites began to panic when they saw Pharaoh’s horses galloping after them. They were quick to forget God’s powerful work and their praises turned to complaints. read more…

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