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46 min Temple Talk Rosh haShana and Parashat Radio

Temple Talk Radio by Rabbi Chaim Richman for The Temple Institute, Jerusalem, Israel:
between Parashat Nitzavim-Vayelech and Rosh haShana…more:

Shabbat Shalom and Shana tova
Get here your Rosh HaShanah Greeting-Card > for free

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Shabbat NITZAVIM & ROSH HASHANAH Video Commentary

Greeting CardsDeutoronomy 29:9 – 30:20
Isaiah 61:10 – 63:9

◄ click Shana Tova greeting card and use for free

Video Commentary by Rabbi Richman for The Temple Institute, Jerusalem:

    „Standing together, shoulder to shoulder, upright, focused and with purpose, all Israel is poised to enter the land promised by G-d and the covenant sworn to by their fathers. Shoulder to shoulder, side by side, with the generations that have preceded us and with the generations that will follow us, we are determined to fulfill our responsibility as G-d’s partners in the perfection of creation, as we stand poised to enter the new year of 5777, may it be a year blessed with all good things for all who love and fear the G-d of Israel. Shana Tova! May we be written and signed in the Book of Life!“…more:

Shabbat Shalom and Shana Tova

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Nitzavim-Vayelech with Rosh HaShana Greeting Cards

Greeting CardsDeutoronomy 29:9 – 31:30
Isaiah 61:10 – 63:9

◄ click Shana Tova greeting card

Video Commentary by Rabbi Chaim Richman, The Temple Institute, Jerusalem:

    „In this week’s parasha the children of Israel are about to enter into a covenant with Hashem, and we are today about to enter into the new year of 5775. The same challenge that stood before Israel as she stood poised to enter the land, stands before us today. We must stand strong in the face of the evil and death that encompasses us all around, and be poised and ready to take a stand and to act for good and life and blessing in the world. Building the Holy Temple, a source of light and blessing and a bulwark against the curse of darkness is this generation’s challenge and responsibility. We must stand together as one and build!“…more:

Shabbat Shalom and Shana Tova

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Shabbat Nitzavim-VaYelech Reading and Video-Commentary

Deuteronomy 29:10-31:30; Isaiah 61:10-63:9

    Video commentary by Rabbi Chaim Richman, The Temple Institute:
    „The world is in turmoil, but when Israel stands – nitzavim – strong, steady and determined to enter into and inherit her destiny – then nothing can harm her, for G-d is with her.“

Rosh Hashanah

Rosh Hashanah

Rosh Hashanah – Photos © by formoretti

Rosh Hashanah (Jewish new year, 1st- 2nd Tishrei)
Greeting card »» download and print.

Shabbat Shalom

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A Happy New Year with a Song for our Readers

With a musical New Year’s greeting, „I Gotta ‚Love You Rosh Hashanah“ (Sabbath songs) from Taglit-birthright israel

we thank all our dear and loyal readers around the world and ask all of you, and you personally, for forgiveness if we have violated your feelings as a Jew, a Moslem or a Christian in any article of the year 5772. We look forward to a common path of understanding lying before us, the understanding of each other, really from the heart, and wish you a blessed, happy, successful and pleasant years 5773.

Shanah Tova
Your Editorial of
God’s Sabbath International

P.S.
Here you will find the Rosh Hashanah-comment
and here Last Minute Rosh Hashanah greeting cards >

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Parashat Shabbat Nitzavim Readings and Commentary

Deuteronomy 29:10-30:20; Isaiah 61:10-63:9

With The Burning Bush the story of Moses began, today we are approaching the end of his farewell-story. In German Synagogues it’s usal to sing a farewell Sabbath Song, the „Adon Olam“, at the end of every Shabbatmorning ministry in order to protect us from forgetting that He is the „Lord of the Universe“ when we are back in our homes▼

Commentary by Michael Schneider, Jerusalem:
It is common that these two weekly Torah portions are read together on a Shabbat. Further, this Shabbat the 25th Elul is als in Judaism marked as the first Day of Creation of the universe – and six days later at the creation of man we celebrate the New Year 5768.
We approaching Moses’ farewell speech before the leaders of the tribes. In our reading we find a confirmation of validity and eternity in the promises to Moses, the humble servant of God as in verses 14 and 15: „Now not with you alone am I making this covenant and this oath… but both with those who stand here with us today in the presence of the LORD our God and with those who are not with us here today.” A eternal covenant!“then the LORD your God will restore you from captivity, and have compassion on you, and will gather you again from all the peoples where the LORD your God has scattered you.” (30:3)

In the same chapter the Lord of hosts says that His commandments are not ‘Mission Impossible’ caliber, but can be reached. As a believer I understand, that God’s commands can be observed. We do not need to travel across continents and countries, even not to so-called revival conferences to experience God and His will – for His ‘Word is very near’ – to your mouth and your heart!

It was assured from then that the Good News, God’s divine word, would be spread all over the globe and no one would need to travel to experience salvation or healing.

„See, I have set before you today life and prosperity, and death and adversity!” (verse 15) This is the LORD’s same proclamation to man today. The prophet Isaiah wrote: “I have spread out My hands all day long to a rebellious people…” (Isaiah 65:2).

Moses pled and hopes that his people, who he knew well for 40 years, would “choose life, and therefore live… between life and death, blessing and curse, that I have set before you” (30:19). It is also set before us today!

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Parashat Shabbat Ki Tavo Readings and Commentary

Deuteronomy 26:1 till 29:8; Isaiah 60:1 till 22
From 1st Elul thru Hoshana Raba Psalm 27 will be read additionally in the Shacharit and Maariv
( For Rosh Hashanah Greeting Cards click > Greeting Cards )

    But first of all „Listen to the Music“ – A all days morning and Sabbath Song :

Commentary by Michael Schneider, Jerusalem:
The backdrop of this week’s Shabbat reading is the giving of the “first fruit” of the ground “when you enter the land which the LORD your God gives you as an inheritance…” (Deuteronomy 26:1-2). As we can see, it is a commandment that relies on being physically located in the Land of Israel. Every time a person brought this sacrifice to the LORD, he emphasized his gratefulness for and connection to the land and people of Israel.

The Hebrew word for “first” is reshit, which is also the first word in the Bible, leading Jewish scholars and sages to conclude in the Talmud that the universe was created because of these first fruit offerings. Moses goes on to enumerate God’s mighty deeds on behalf of Israel, including how He took “a wandering Aramean,” as he affectionately refers to Jacob in verse 5, and made out of him a vast and mighty nation and planted them in the Promised Land. He then urges the giving of thanks. “You shall rejoice in all the good which the LORD your God has given you…” (26:11) Here we find a principle: True joy comes from giving our first fruits, the best of what we have, to the Lord. This leads to perfect joy. King Solomon, blessed with divine wisdom, backs up this principle in Proverbs 3:9-10: “Honor the LORD from your wealth and from the first of all your produce; So your barns will be filled with plenty and your vats will overflow with new wine.”

Solomon knew this secret.

This offering of the firstling was and should always be accompanied by prayer (26:15): “Look down from Your holy habitation, from heaven, and bless Your people Israel, and the land which You have given us…” It should then be followed with a remembrance to keep God’s statutes and ordinances “with all your heart and with all your soul.”

In chapter 27…

God’s Sabbath International tries to observe common understandings between Jews and Christians – here:
…we read that once the Children of Israel crossed the Jordan River (symbolic of baptism) they were commanded to write the Law (Torah) on their hearts. If we translate the situation to the spiritual realm with our personal walk with Him and the Promise Land is the promised Kingdom of Heaven, we can see the fullfillment of the New Covenant shown in Jeremiah 31: “I will put my law (torah) in their minds and write it on their hearts.” In our portion in verse 8 we find an interesting ending, which in Hebrew says ba’er hetev, and which means in English: make it clear or explain it well. By this Orthodox Jews understand, in keeping with the Jewish tradition, that when the Written Law was given so was the the Oral Law, those unwritten precepts that later became the foundation of the Mishna and Talmud.

Moses added instructions before the Children of Israel (without him) cross the Jordan River. Six tribes were assembled on the mount of blessing, Gerizim, and the other six on the mount of curses, Ebal, where we find a long list of things those redeemed by the Lord are not to do (verses 15-26). In chapter 28 we find a lineup of all the blessings that will come over the people if they will hear and follow the voice of their God. “Blessed shall you be when you come in, and blessed shall you be when you go out.” (verse 26) This blessing is used among Jews till today, and is even framed and hanged as a blessing over homes.

But Moses knew his people and therefore he continues a much longer list of “but if you do not obey the LORD…” In this list from verse 16 to 69 we find all what one wouldn’t wish upon himself or anyone else. We read in 28:28: “The LORD will smite you with madness and with blindness and with bewilderment of heart.” Unfortunately, also verse 53 was put into effect in the History of the Jewish people, when the city of Jerusalem was sieged.

The answer, why all this will happen, is also given: “Because you did not serve the LORD your God with joy and a glad heart…” Moses continues to warn them with these words: “It shall come about that as the LORD delighted over you to prosper you, and multiply you, so the LORD will delight over you to make you perish and destroy you; and you will be torn from the land where you are entering to possess it.” (verse 63) “In the morning you shall say, ‚Would that it were evening!‘ And at evening you shall say, ‚Would that it were morning!‘ because of the dread of your heart…” What terrible words. But in our messianic chapter in Isaiah 60 we find comfort. After all the suffering that came over the Jewish nation and what was foretold already in Moses’ time, also this promise will be fulfilled: “Arise, shine for your light has come, and the glory of the LORD has risen upon you!”

Shabbat Shalom

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Shabbat Nitzavim-VaYelech Reading and Commentary

Deuteronomy 29:10-31:30; Isaiah 61:10-63:9

With The Burning Bush the story of Moses began, today we are approaching the end of his farewell-story. In German Synagogues it’s usal to sing a farewell Sabbath Song, the „Adon Olam“, at the end of every Shabbatmorning ministry in order to protect us from forgetting that He is the „Lord of the Universe“ when we are back in our homes▼

Commentary by Michael Schneider,
israel today, Jerusalem:

It is common that these two weekly Torah portions are read together on a Shabbat. Further, this Shabbat the 25th Elul is als in Judaism marked as the first Day of Creation of the universe – and six days later at the creation of man we celebrate the New Year 5768.
We approaching Moses’ farewell speech before the leaders of the tribes. In our reading we find a confirmation of validity and eternity in the promises to Moses, the humble servant of God as in verses 14 and 15: „Now not with you alone am I making this covenant and this oath… but both with those who stand here with us today in the presence of the LORD our God and with those who are not with us here today.” A eternal covenant!“then the LORD your God will restore you from captivity, and have compassion on you, and will gather you again from all the peoples where the LORD your God has scattered you.” (30:3)

In the same chapter the Lord of hosts says that His commandments are not ‘Mission Impossible’ caliber, but can be reached. As a believer I understand, that God’s commands can be observed. We do not need to travel across continents and countries, even not to so-called revival conferences to experience God and His will – for His ‘Word is very near’ – to your mouth and your heart!

It was assured from then that the Good News, God’s divine word, would be spread all over the globe and no one would need to travel to experience salvation or healing.

„See, I have set before you today life and prosperity, and death and adversity!” (verse 15) This is the LORD’s same proclamation to man today. The prophet Isaiah wrote: “I have spread out My hands all day long to a rebellious people…” (Isaiah 65:2).

Moses pled and hopes that his people, who he knew well for 40 years, would “choose life, and therefore live… between life and death, blessing and curse, that I have set before you” (30:19). It is also set before us today!

In our second reading, we reach Moses’ last day. He was exactly 120-years-old. According to Jewish tradition, he was born and died on the same day of the year, the seventh day of the Hebrew month Adar. The age, 120, is reserved for a righteous person. This is the memorial day of all descendants whose death location and date is unknown, like Moses.

Joshua, takes over as leader and brings the people over the Jordan into the Promised Land. Moses, before he left, said to the people: “Be strong and courageous, do not be afraid or tremble at them, for the LORD your God is the one who goes with you He will not fail you or forsake you.“ (31:6) He encouraged them that just because he was leaving, didn’t mean God would.

The last thing Moses did was write the whole Torah and pass it to the priests, the Levites. This is also the last commandment of the 613 Commandments of the Torah, to write down the Torah.

But Moses knew to whom he was talking to, that’s why he emphasize so often to be ‘circumcised by heart’ (30:6): „For I know your rebellion and your stubbornness; behold, while I am still alive with you today, you have been rebellious against the LORD; how much more, then, after my death?” (31:27).
We should not put our trust in man, but in the LORD alone!

Shabbat Shalom

Comments are off for this post

A Happy New Year in a Song for our Readers

With a musical New Year’s greeting, „I Gotta ‚Love You Rosh Hashanah“ (Sabbath songs) from Taglit-birthright israel

we thank all our dear and loyal readers around the world and ask all of you, and you personally, for forgiveness if we have violated your feelings as a Jew, a Moslem or a Christian in any article of the year 5770. We look forward to a common path of understanding lying before us, the understanding of each other, really from the heart, and wish you a blessed, happy, successful and pleasant years 5771.

Shanah Tova
Your Editorial of
God’s Sabbath International

P.S.
Here you will find the Rosh Hashanah-comment
and here Last Minute Rosh Hashanah greeting cards >

Comments are off for this post

Special Reading Rosh Hashanah

Genesis 21:1-34; Numbers 29:1-6; 1 Samuel 1:1- 2:10

Abstracts of the Commentary by Michael Schneider,
israel today, Jerusalem:

This Shabbat marks the Jewish New Year of Rosh Hashanah and the celebration of the beginning of mankind.
„Now in the seventh month, on the first day of the month, you shall also have a holy convocation; you shall do no laborious work. It will be to you a day for blowing trumpets.“ (Numbers 29:1)

So, why is it that the Jewish New Year is celebrated in the seventh month? The Bible tells us that the month of Nissan, when Moses led the children of Israel out of Egypt was, „the beginning of months for you; it is to be the first month of the year to you“ Exodus 12:2.
But after the Babylonian Exile in 586 BC, scholars decided that the High Holidays during the seventh month is when the destiny of man is determined and, therefore, man starts a new life thus making the fall holidays the New Year as well.

So we have exactly half a year between the month of salvation and the month of judgment! Or is this parallel to the end-time reign of the Messiah which begins with His salvation and ends with judgment?

The first portion from Genesis 21 and the reading from the prophets in 1 Samuel 1 speaks of two childless women, Sarah and Hannah. We read those scriptures on Rosh Hashanah because, according to Jewish tradition, God opened up their wombs.

In both cases, God brought them to a point in life where they needed to rely solely on Him. With Sarah, it was only at the point where all human intervention was obsolete that God intervened. Sarah was 90 (Genesis 17:17), they „were old, advanced in age; Sarah was past childbearing“ (18:11). Where the natural ends, the miraculous begins as she gave birth to Isaac.

Hannah too, after many prayers at the doorposts of the Temple, was ready to give her all – including her child back to God for His service! After giving birth to Samuel God blessed her with another five children. „He raises the poor from the dust, He lifts the needy from the ash heap to make them sit with nobles, and inherit a seat of honor“ (1 Samuel 2:8).

According to Jewish tradition, on Rosh Hashanah the books of heaven are opened before the Almighty, and the Ten Days of Repentance begin until the great Day of Atonement, Yom Kippur, when God’s Judgment has fallen!

I wish you all a ‘Good Inscription’ in the Book of Life, as it is the common greeting at this time of year along with

Shana Tova (Happy New Year)!

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